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Blog Information, fun facts and stories from The Flag Store!

Who We Are!

Canadian Flag

The Original Flag Store opened for business in 1965 in the small town of Thornton, Ontario -– just one hour’’s drive north of Toronto. We quickly became known as the company who could make a business, a cottage or an event burst with colour and pride.

In 1965 any individual could walk into our store and ask,
“ “Can you put this on a flag?””
…and our response was almost always -– yes!

Today, 46 years later, the original family still take great pride in offering the same service, the same quality and the same personal guidance to all customers who require custom flags and flagpoles. We also offer many other choices of “soft” advertising for your company, your family name or your location.

We appliqué our flags and all of our flags are MADE IN CANADA! We can also print on different weights and kinds of material to keep your costs at a minimum while keeping your options completely open. Using nylon, polyester, paper or vinyl, we listen to your needs and help you to choose the right medium to make you look good!

We are Canada’’s custom flag manufacturer!

If you require a professional look, in any printed fabric or custom sewn durability, our product will exceed your expectation!

Our corporate philosophy is simple:

Quality, Service and Value for your Money.

Whether it’s a stock item, an international flag, a custom banner, a flag rental or an installation – we offer you the best choices to maximize your marketing dollar. We understand Canadian pride and the real meaning of ~

Just watch for our flag!

Happy July 4th To Our American Friends

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On July 4th, the Continental Congress formally adopted the Declaration of Independence, which had been written largely by Jefferson. Though the vote for actual independence took place on July 2nd, from then on the 4th became the day that was celebrated as the birth of American independence.

Are you trying to contact us by phone today?

Unfortunately today June 21st our phone lines are down.  We are hoping service will be restored soon!

Congratulations Toronto Raptors!

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Look what we have…Get them while you can.

We Love to See Your Photos!

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Thanks to a great, long time customer Paul for sending us a photo of his spectacular Formenta Flagpole at the cottage.  GO RAPTORS!

75th Anniversary of D-Day

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Today is the 75th anniversary of D-Day, Operation Overlord, the day during World War II on which the Allies — American, British, and Canadian troops — invaded France, a giant milestone on the road to defeating Nazi Germany.

It’s tough today to understand the scope and risk that was involved in the invasion, and to appreciate the sacrifices of 4,414 Allied soldiers killed and more than 9,000 wounded or missing.

Fewer than 4 percent of World War II veterans are still alive. So, organizers of the big commemorations assume that this might well be the last major commemoration during which they’ll be able to honor any significant number of participants in the invasion.

With that in mind, here are 17 inspiring quotes to give us all a little bit of appreciation for what it might have been like to be part of the invasion, or to wait with bated breath for news of what had happened.

1. “We’ll start the war from right here.”
–Brigadier General Theodore Roosevelt Jr., son of the former president, who landed with his troops in the wrong place on Utah Beach

2. “If any blame or fault attaches to the attempt, it is mine alone.”
–General Dwight Eisenhower, future president, in a draft or remarks he’d made in case the invasion was a failure.

3. “Hitler made only one big mistake when he built his Atlantic Wall. He forgot to put a roof on it.”
–World War II U.S. paratrooper aphorism

4. “They fight not for the lust of conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate.”
— President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s official address announcing the invasion.

5. “So much of the progress that would define the 20th century, on both sides of the Atlantic, came down to the battle for a slice of beach only six miles long and two miles wide.”
–President Barak Obama, 10 years ago, in Normandy to mark the 65th anniversary of D-Day.

6. “The waiting for history to be made was the most difficult. I spent much time in prayer. Being cooped up made it worse. Like everyone else, I was seasick and the stench of vomit permeated our craft.”
–Private Clair Galdonik

7. “They’re murdering us here. Let’s move inland and get murdered.”
–Colonel Charles D. Canham, 116th Infantry Regiment commander, on Omaha Beach

8. “I don’t feel that I’m any kind of hero. To me, the work had to be done. I was asked to do it. So I did. When I lecture kids I tell them the same thing.”
–Private First Class Joe Lesniewski​

9. “You get your ass on the beach. I’ll be there waiting for you and I’ll tell you what to do. There ain’t anything in this plan that is going to go right.”
–Colonel Paul R. Goode, in a pre-attack briefing to the 175th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division

10. “At the core, the American citizen soldiers knew the difference between right and wrong, and they didn’t want to live in a world in which wrong prevailed. So they fought, and won, and we all of us, living and yet to be born, must be forever profoundly grateful.”
–Author Stephen Ambrose

11. “Today, when people thank me for my service, I figure three years of my time is a cheap price to pay for this country. Nobody owes me a thing.”
–Lieutenant Buck Compton

12. “The first time I saw a poster wanting men to sign up to be paratroopers and heard how hard it would be to make it in, I knew that was for me. I wanted an elite group of soldiers around me.”
–Staff Sergeant Frank Soboleski

13. “There is one great thing that you men will all be able to say after this war is over and you are home once again. … When you are sitting by the fireplace with your grandson on your knee and he asks you what you did in the great World War II … you can look him straight in the eye and say, ‘Son, your Granddaddy rode with the Great Third Army and a son-of-a-goddamned-bitch named Georgie Patton!’ ”
–General George S. Patton

14. “I’m very disappointed, and I hate leaving the world feeling this way.”
–Private Jack Port, now 97, on the state of the world currently

15. “It was a different world then. It was a world that requires young men like myself to be prepared to die for a civilization that was worth living in.”
–Harry Read, British D-Day veteran who jumped again this week with the British Parachute Regiment’s freefall display team.

16. “I cherish the memories of a question my grandson asked me the other day when he said, ‘Grandpa, were you a hero in the war?’ Grandpa said, ‘No, but I served in a company of heroes.'”
–Major Richard Winters

17. “All I could see was water, miles and miles of water. But this was D-Day and nobody went back to England and a lot of infantry riding in open barges seasick to the low-tide beaches were depending on us to draw the Germans off the causeways and gun batteries, and so, as Porter hurled himself against me, I grabbed both sides of the door and threw myself at the water.”
–Private David Kenyon Webster, who became a writer after the war

June Is Pride Month

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June
The month of June was chosen for LGBT Pride Month to commemorate the Stonewall riots, which occurred at the end of June 1969. As a result, many pride events are held during this month to recognize the impact LGBT people have had in the world.

Go Raptors Go!

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We have 3’x5′ Toronto Raptors flags and Toronto Raptors car flags still available.  Get them before we sell out and support The Toronto Raptors!

The History of Victoria Day

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For many Canadians, the Victoria Day holiday weekend is the time to start thinking about summer. Bonus: It’s a day off school! But why do we celebrate the birthday of Queen Victoria, who died nearly 115 years ago?

Until 1956, the birthday of the monarch—that’s the king or queen—of Great Britain was also celebrated in Canada, sometimes on his or her own birthday, sometimes around that time and sometimes on Victoria Day.

Well, probably because she was so important in the creation of our country. She was queen when Canada became its own country in 1867, and she was the one who chose Ottawa as our capital. After she died in 1901, the Canadian government declared that May 24 would be a holiday in her honour. (If the 24th fell on a Sunday, the holiday would be May 25.)

In 1957, Victoria Day was named the official birthday in Canada of Queen Elizabeth II. (In Great Britain, her birthday, which is actually April 21, is celebrated in June.) And Victoria Day is officially held on the Monday right before May 25.

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